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Couch Potato No More: How the Benefits of Exercise Transfer to the Brain

Brain aging is reversible. How? Why? And how much can we rejuvenate an already aged brain? Those were the one conviction and three questions that guided me throughout my post-doctoral work at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Yes, this isn’t like my usual articles. For the first time, I’m covering my own work—a […]

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Brain aging is reversible. How? Why? And how much can we rejuvenate an already aged brain?

Those were the one conviction and three questions that guided me throughout my post-doctoral work at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Yes, this isn’t like my usual articles. For the first time, I’m covering my own work—a multi-year passion project that spans diverse ways to reverse brain aging, probes the intersection between body and mind, and hopefully one day can help battle the seemingly inevitable memory and cognitive decline we all face as we age.

The results were published in Science last week, in partnership with Alana Horowitz, PhD candidate, and under the guidance of Dr. Saul Villeda in the Department of Anatomy and the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research.

In summary: exercise, such as running, benefits an aging brain in such a way that it performs more like its younger self. We found that blood components from exercised mice, both adult and aged, can transfer memory and brain regeneration benefits to elderly “couch potato” mice. Surprisingly, the main trigger of that brain-stimulating cascade was a protein in the liver, which then exerted its influence on the brain through a complex game of molecular telephone in the blood that we still don’t fully understand.

The takeaway? A liver-to-brain biological highway, spurred into action by consistent running, is enough to substantially reverse brain aging, specifically in the hippocampus—the root of memory that captures the story of your life, and a region that notably declines with age and in Alzheimer’s disease. By better understanding the blood messengers involved, we could artificially activate this pathway and potentially protect the mental essence of what makes you you—even as your brain falters with age or disease.

We are still very far from making an “exercise in an anti-aging pill.” However, the study builds upon others to show that restoring memory in an aged brain with a drug isn’t complete fantasy.

Sound crazy? Here’s how the sausage got made.

The Methuselah Crossover

Those who’ve followed me since my early blogging days know I’m obsessed with the intersection at the heart of three questions. One, how does exercise benefit the brain? Two, what slows age-related memory loss? Three, how does the brain regenerate?

I got a chance to explore this intersection when I joined the Villeda lab in 2015. Battling an urge to leave academia, I was seduced by his (and other teams’) findings that plasma—the watery component of blood, minus blood cells—from young mice, when injected multiple times into aged ones, was sufficient to stimulate an aged brain’s regenerative capabilities and memory functions.

It got me wondering: years of research show that memory loss in brain aging can be slowed or even reserved—“young blood” isn’t alone. Aerobic exercise, such as running, is one way. Caloric restriction is another. Or there’s cleaning out “zombie” cells, called senescent cells, that can no longer perform their usual action but instead pump out toxic inflammatory chemicals to their surroundings.

How do these treatments, often given to or exerted on the body, influence the brain? Are there chemical messengers in the blood that squeeze through the blood-brain barrier—a protective film of tightly-knit cells that isolates the brain from many blood components? Or is there an enigmatic conductor somewhere in the body remotely orchestrating a molecular symphony that sparks the fountain of youth in the brain?

In the Blood

Because blood plasma seems to transfer the “essence of youth” to the aged brain (and to the heart, liver, and other organs) from young animals, we first asked: is blood also the carrier of pro-youth factors stimulated by exercise?

We gave aged mice—about 65 or so in human age—running wheels in their cages. Lucky for us, mice love to run when given the chance. Six weeks later, as a sanity check, we found that mice with a running wheel performed far better than their lounging counterparts in multiple memory tests, validating previous studies that show exercise benefits the aging brain.

We then redid the experiment with another group of aged mice. This time, however, we distilled the plasma from runners and injected it into sedentary litter mates over the course of a month. This semi-chronic treatment provides time for the brains of the aged mice to regenerate.

You see, the hippocampus is special in that it’s one of two brain regions that gives birth to new neurons throughout most of life, although the rate declines with age. Newborn neurons take time to mature and integrate into existing neural circuits, like growing a plant and transplanting it into an established ecosystem. Whether this rebirth process happens in humans is profusely debated. However, newborn neurons in rodents have been linked to better performance in several aspects of memory—for example, where’s my car and did I park it in the same place as yesterday?—and is widely considered a measure of rejuvenation in the brain.

Without exercising a day, aged mice injected with the plasma from the runners performed better in memory tests—similar to a human in his or her late 30s or early 40s. Their hippocampi added more newborn neurons and boosted the level of a superstar brain-protective protein called BDNF (brain-derived neurotropic factor). But plasma is its own ecosystem, with a wild mix of hundreds of protein and other factors, that come and go depending on the body’s general climate. So what exactly in the plasma of runner mice is causing this brain boost?

In the Liver

Enter proteomics magic. It’s a big-data approach screen that looks at how protein levels change after certain manipulations, such as exercise. Our screen honed in on GPLD1, a protein in the liver.

It’s a weird one. It’s never previously been linked to brain aging, neurogenesis, or rejuvenation. But Alana found that if you artificially increase the amount of GPLD1 in the liver through genetic modification in aged mice, it recapitulates the memory-enhancing effects of plasma from exercised mice. What’s more, similar to mice, we found that GPLD1 is higher in physically active aged humans compared to inactive people—paving the way to translate our results from mice to men.

It gets weirder. GPLD1 doesn’t go into the brain. It’s too large and gets blocked by that thin film of cells, the blood-brain barrier. So why does it help an aging brain?

The answer seems to be a molecular signaling chain. GPLD1, as an enzyme, works on other proteins that regulate inflammation, including the toxic chemical soup that senescent “zombie” cells spew out in an aged brain.

But the truth is, we’re still figuring it out. What we do know, however, is that exercise has vast and diverse effects throughout the body. Previous studies found that running also stimulates fat cells and muscle to benefit the brain’s regenerative and cognitive functions—with each organ using their own molecular “phone lines.” We know that these signals prevent age-related memory decline.

What we’ve shown, however, is that the body-to-brain information highway can also reverse the effects of brain aging. It means that even the aged brain is still remarkably flexible and its deterioration isn’t set in stone. It also suggests that one day, it might be possible to deliver GPLD1 or other brain-boosting molecules to elderly people incapable of exercise and transfer those beneficial effects—without them ever leaving the couch.

A Peter Pan Brain?

What comes next? I’m no longer in academia, but my original three questions about brain aging—and its reversal—remain.

One: how? GPLD1, though very potent, isn’t the only molecule that bridges body to brain. Exercise also affects blood vessels and blood flow, bone and skeletal structure, which combined are bound to impact mental processes. What are those pathways? How prominent are they and how do they work?

Two: why? Aging isn’t just loss of regeneration. The brain cells’ energy factory—the mitochondria—malfunctions. Inflammation flares up. Senescent zombie cells accumulate. Does GPLD1 affect any of those hallmarks of aging?

Finally, the big one. Our study shows that blood transfers the brain-rejuvenating effects of exercise when the plasma is taken from mature and aged mice. But blood also has pro-youth, brain-beneficial factors when drawn from young mice. Can we combine the effects of exercise and youth? Would lazy aged mice, receiving plasma from physically active and young mice, exhibit an even larger level of rejuvenation than either exercise or young blood alone? Would we? How far back can we reverse the wheel of time when it comes to brain aging?

Image Credit: Fitsum Admasu on Unsplash

Source: https://singularityhub.com/2020/07/14/couch-potato-no-more-how-the-benefits-of-exercise-transfer-to-the-brain/

AI

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage. Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, […]

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Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage.

Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, which enables you to search and explore Hungarian cultural heritage, including 600,000 faces over 500,000 images. For example, you can find historical works by author Mór Jókai or photos on topics like weddings. The Arcanum team chose Amazon Rekognition to free valuable staff from time and cost-intensive manual labeling, and improved label accuracy to make 200,000 previously unsearchable images (approximately 40% of image inventory), available to users.

Amazon Rekognition makes it easy to add image and video analysis to your applications using highly scalable machine learning (ML) technology that requires no previous ML expertise to use. Amazon Rekognition also provides highly accurate facial recognition and facial search capabilities to detect, analyze, and compare faces.

Arcanum uses this facial recognition feature in their image database services to help you find particular people in Arcanum’s articles. This post discusses their challenges and why they chose Amazon Rekognition as their solution.

Automated image labeling challenges

Arcanum dedicated a team of three people to start tagging and labeling content for Hungaricana. The team quickly learned that they would need to invest more than 3 months of time-consuming and repetitive human labor to provide accurate search capabilities to their customers. Considering the size of the team and scope of the existing project, Arcanum needed a better solution that would automate image and object labelling at scale.

Automated image labeling solutions

To speed up and automate image labeling, Arcanum turned to Amazon Rekognition to enable users to search photos by keywords (for example, type of historic event, place name, or a person relevant to Hungarian history).

For the Hungaricana project, preprocessing all the images was challenging. Arcanum ran a TensorFlow face search across all 28 million pages on a machine with 8 GPUs in their own offices to extract only faces from images.

The following screenshot shows what an extract looks like (image provided by Arcanum Database Ltd).

The images containing only faces are sent to Amazon Rekognition, invoking the IndexFaces operation to add a face to the collection. For each face that is detected in the specified face collection, Amazon Rekognition extracts facial features into a feature vector and stores it in an Amazon Aurora database. Amazon Rekognition uses feature vectors when it performs face match and search operations using the SearchFaces and SearchFacesByImage operations.

The image preprocessing helped create a very efficient and cost-effective way to index faces. The following diagram summarizes the preprocessing workflow.

As for the web application, the workflow starts with a Hungaricana user making a face search request. The following diagram illustrates the application workflow.

The workflow includes the following steps:

  1. The user requests a facial match by uploading the image. The web request is automatically distributed by the Elastic Load Balancer to the webserver fleet.
  2. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) powers application servers that handle the user request.
  3. The uploaded image is stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).
  4. Amazon Rekognition indexes the face and runs SearchFaces to look for a face similar to the new face ID.
  5. The output of the search face by image operation is stored in Amazon ElastiCache, a fully managed in-memory data store.
  6. The metadata of the indexed faces are stored in an Aurora relational database built for the cloud.
  7. The resulting face thumbnails are served to the customer via the fast content-delivery network (CDN) service Amazon CloudFront.

Experimenting and live testing Hungaricana

During our test of Hungaricana, the application performed extremely well. The searches not only correctly identified people, but also provided links to all publications and sources in Arcanum’s privately owned database where found faces are present. For example, the following screenshot shows the result of the famous composer and pianist Franz Liszt.

The application provided 42 pages of 6×4 results. The results are capped to 1,000. The 100% scores are the confidence scores returned by Amazon Rekognition and are rounded up to whole numbers.

The application of Hungaricana has always promptly, and with a high degree of certainty, presented results and links to all corresponding publications.

Business results

By introducing Amazon Rekognition into their workflow, Arcanum enabled a better customer experience, including building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events.

The concept of face searching using artificial intelligence certainly isn’t new. But Hungaricana uses it in a very creative, unique way.

Amazon Rekognition allowed Arcanum to realize three distinct advantages:

  • Time savings – The time to market speed increased dramatically. Now, instead of spending several months of intense manual labor to label all the images, the company can do this job in a few days. Before, basic labeling on 150,000 images took months for three people to complete.
  • Cost savings – Arcanum saved around $15,000 on the Hungaricana project. Before using Amazon Rekognition, there was no automation, so a human workforce had to scan all the images. Now, employees can shift their focus to other high-value tasks.
  • Improved accuracy – Users now have a much better experience regarding hit rates. Since Arcanum started using Amazon Rekognition, the number of hits has doubled. Before, out of 500,000 images, about 200,000 weren’t searchable. But with Amazon Rekognition, search is now possible for all 500,000 images.

 “Amazon Rekognition made Hungarian culture, history, and heritage more accessible to the world,” says Előd Biszak, Arcanum CEO. “It has made research a lot easier for customers building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events. We cannot wait to see what the future of artificial intelligence has to offer to enrich our content further.”

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to add highly scalable face and image analysis to an enterprise-level image gallery to improve label accuracy, reduce costs, and save time.

You can test Amazon Rekognition features such as facial analysis, face comparison, or celebrity recognition on images specific to your use case on the Amazon Rekognition console.

For video presentations and tutorials, see Getting Started with Amazon Rekognition. For more information about Amazon Rekognition, see Amazon Rekognition Documentation.


About the Authors

Siniša Mikašinović is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS Luxembourg, covering Central and Eastern Europe—a region full of opportunities, talented and innovative developers, ISVs, and startups. He helps customers adopt AWS services as well as acquire new skills, learn best practices, and succeed globally with the power of AWS. His areas of expertise are Game Tech and Microsoft on AWS. Siniša is a PowerShell enthusiast, a gamer, and a father of a small and very loud boy. He flies under the flags of Croatia and Serbia.

Cameron Peron is Senior Marketing Manager for AWS Amazon Rekognition and the AWS AI/ML community. He evangelizes how AI/ML innovation solves complex challenges facing community, enterprise, and startups alike. Out of the office, he enjoys staying active with kettlebell-sport, spending time with his family and friends, and is an avid fan of Euro-league basketball.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/arcanum-makes-hungarian-heritage-accessible-with-amazon-rekognition/

Continue Reading

AI

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage. Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, […]

Published

on

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage.

Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, which enables you to search and explore Hungarian cultural heritage, including 600,000 faces over 500,000 images. For example, you can find historical works by author Mór Jókai or photos on topics like weddings. The Arcanum team chose Amazon Rekognition to free valuable staff from time and cost-intensive manual labeling, and improved label accuracy to make 200,000 previously unsearchable images (approximately 40% of image inventory), available to users.

Amazon Rekognition makes it easy to add image and video analysis to your applications using highly scalable machine learning (ML) technology that requires no previous ML expertise to use. Amazon Rekognition also provides highly accurate facial recognition and facial search capabilities to detect, analyze, and compare faces.

Arcanum uses this facial recognition feature in their image database services to help you find particular people in Arcanum’s articles. This post discusses their challenges and why they chose Amazon Rekognition as their solution.

Automated image labeling challenges

Arcanum dedicated a team of three people to start tagging and labeling content for Hungaricana. The team quickly learned that they would need to invest more than 3 months of time-consuming and repetitive human labor to provide accurate search capabilities to their customers. Considering the size of the team and scope of the existing project, Arcanum needed a better solution that would automate image and object labelling at scale.

Automated image labeling solutions

To speed up and automate image labeling, Arcanum turned to Amazon Rekognition to enable users to search photos by keywords (for example, type of historic event, place name, or a person relevant to Hungarian history).

For the Hungaricana project, preprocessing all the images was challenging. Arcanum ran a TensorFlow face search across all 28 million pages on a machine with 8 GPUs in their own offices to extract only faces from images.

The following screenshot shows what an extract looks like (image provided by Arcanum Database Ltd).

The images containing only faces are sent to Amazon Rekognition, invoking the IndexFaces operation to add a face to the collection. For each face that is detected in the specified face collection, Amazon Rekognition extracts facial features into a feature vector and stores it in an Amazon Aurora database. Amazon Rekognition uses feature vectors when it performs face match and search operations using the SearchFaces and SearchFacesByImage operations.

The image preprocessing helped create a very efficient and cost-effective way to index faces. The following diagram summarizes the preprocessing workflow.

As for the web application, the workflow starts with a Hungaricana user making a face search request. The following diagram illustrates the application workflow.

The workflow includes the following steps:

  1. The user requests a facial match by uploading the image. The web request is automatically distributed by the Elastic Load Balancer to the webserver fleet.
  2. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) powers application servers that handle the user request.
  3. The uploaded image is stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).
  4. Amazon Rekognition indexes the face and runs SearchFaces to look for a face similar to the new face ID.
  5. The output of the search face by image operation is stored in Amazon ElastiCache, a fully managed in-memory data store.
  6. The metadata of the indexed faces are stored in an Aurora relational database built for the cloud.
  7. The resulting face thumbnails are served to the customer via the fast content-delivery network (CDN) service Amazon CloudFront.

Experimenting and live testing Hungaricana

During our test of Hungaricana, the application performed extremely well. The searches not only correctly identified people, but also provided links to all publications and sources in Arcanum’s privately owned database where found faces are present. For example, the following screenshot shows the result of the famous composer and pianist Franz Liszt.

The application provided 42 pages of 6×4 results. The results are capped to 1,000. The 100% scores are the confidence scores returned by Amazon Rekognition and are rounded up to whole numbers.

The application of Hungaricana has always promptly, and with a high degree of certainty, presented results and links to all corresponding publications.

Business results

By introducing Amazon Rekognition into their workflow, Arcanum enabled a better customer experience, including building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events.

The concept of face searching using artificial intelligence certainly isn’t new. But Hungaricana uses it in a very creative, unique way.

Amazon Rekognition allowed Arcanum to realize three distinct advantages:

  • Time savings – The time to market speed increased dramatically. Now, instead of spending several months of intense manual labor to label all the images, the company can do this job in a few days. Before, basic labeling on 150,000 images took months for three people to complete.
  • Cost savings – Arcanum saved around $15,000 on the Hungaricana project. Before using Amazon Rekognition, there was no automation, so a human workforce had to scan all the images. Now, employees can shift their focus to other high-value tasks.
  • Improved accuracy – Users now have a much better experience regarding hit rates. Since Arcanum started using Amazon Rekognition, the number of hits has doubled. Before, out of 500,000 images, about 200,000 weren’t searchable. But with Amazon Rekognition, search is now possible for all 500,000 images.

 “Amazon Rekognition made Hungarian culture, history, and heritage more accessible to the world,” says Előd Biszak, Arcanum CEO. “It has made research a lot easier for customers building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events. We cannot wait to see what the future of artificial intelligence has to offer to enrich our content further.”

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to add highly scalable face and image analysis to an enterprise-level image gallery to improve label accuracy, reduce costs, and save time.

You can test Amazon Rekognition features such as facial analysis, face comparison, or celebrity recognition on images specific to your use case on the Amazon Rekognition console.

For video presentations and tutorials, see Getting Started with Amazon Rekognition. For more information about Amazon Rekognition, see Amazon Rekognition Documentation.


About the Authors

Siniša Mikašinović is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS Luxembourg, covering Central and Eastern Europe—a region full of opportunities, talented and innovative developers, ISVs, and startups. He helps customers adopt AWS services as well as acquire new skills, learn best practices, and succeed globally with the power of AWS. His areas of expertise are Game Tech and Microsoft on AWS. Siniša is a PowerShell enthusiast, a gamer, and a father of a small and very loud boy. He flies under the flags of Croatia and Serbia.

Cameron Peron is Senior Marketing Manager for AWS Amazon Rekognition and the AWS AI/ML community. He evangelizes how AI/ML innovation solves complex challenges facing community, enterprise, and startups alike. Out of the office, he enjoys staying active with kettlebell-sport, spending time with his family and friends, and is an avid fan of Euro-league basketball.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/arcanum-makes-hungarian-heritage-accessible-with-amazon-rekognition/

Continue Reading

AI

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage. Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, […]

Published

on

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage.

Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, which enables you to search and explore Hungarian cultural heritage, including 600,000 faces over 500,000 images. For example, you can find historical works by author Mór Jókai or photos on topics like weddings. The Arcanum team chose Amazon Rekognition to free valuable staff from time and cost-intensive manual labeling, and improved label accuracy to make 200,000 previously unsearchable images (approximately 40% of image inventory), available to users.

Amazon Rekognition makes it easy to add image and video analysis to your applications using highly scalable machine learning (ML) technology that requires no previous ML expertise to use. Amazon Rekognition also provides highly accurate facial recognition and facial search capabilities to detect, analyze, and compare faces.

Arcanum uses this facial recognition feature in their image database services to help you find particular people in Arcanum’s articles. This post discusses their challenges and why they chose Amazon Rekognition as their solution.

Automated image labeling challenges

Arcanum dedicated a team of three people to start tagging and labeling content for Hungaricana. The team quickly learned that they would need to invest more than 3 months of time-consuming and repetitive human labor to provide accurate search capabilities to their customers. Considering the size of the team and scope of the existing project, Arcanum needed a better solution that would automate image and object labelling at scale.

Automated image labeling solutions

To speed up and automate image labeling, Arcanum turned to Amazon Rekognition to enable users to search photos by keywords (for example, type of historic event, place name, or a person relevant to Hungarian history).

For the Hungaricana project, preprocessing all the images was challenging. Arcanum ran a TensorFlow face search across all 28 million pages on a machine with 8 GPUs in their own offices to extract only faces from images.

The following screenshot shows what an extract looks like (image provided by Arcanum Database Ltd).

The images containing only faces are sent to Amazon Rekognition, invoking the IndexFaces operation to add a face to the collection. For each face that is detected in the specified face collection, Amazon Rekognition extracts facial features into a feature vector and stores it in an Amazon Aurora database. Amazon Rekognition uses feature vectors when it performs face match and search operations using the SearchFaces and SearchFacesByImage operations.

The image preprocessing helped create a very efficient and cost-effective way to index faces. The following diagram summarizes the preprocessing workflow.

As for the web application, the workflow starts with a Hungaricana user making a face search request. The following diagram illustrates the application workflow.

The workflow includes the following steps:

  1. The user requests a facial match by uploading the image. The web request is automatically distributed by the Elastic Load Balancer to the webserver fleet.
  2. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) powers application servers that handle the user request.
  3. The uploaded image is stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).
  4. Amazon Rekognition indexes the face and runs SearchFaces to look for a face similar to the new face ID.
  5. The output of the search face by image operation is stored in Amazon ElastiCache, a fully managed in-memory data store.
  6. The metadata of the indexed faces are stored in an Aurora relational database built for the cloud.
  7. The resulting face thumbnails are served to the customer via the fast content-delivery network (CDN) service Amazon CloudFront.

Experimenting and live testing Hungaricana

During our test of Hungaricana, the application performed extremely well. The searches not only correctly identified people, but also provided links to all publications and sources in Arcanum’s privately owned database where found faces are present. For example, the following screenshot shows the result of the famous composer and pianist Franz Liszt.

The application provided 42 pages of 6×4 results. The results are capped to 1,000. The 100% scores are the confidence scores returned by Amazon Rekognition and are rounded up to whole numbers.

The application of Hungaricana has always promptly, and with a high degree of certainty, presented results and links to all corresponding publications.

Business results

By introducing Amazon Rekognition into their workflow, Arcanum enabled a better customer experience, including building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events.

The concept of face searching using artificial intelligence certainly isn’t new. But Hungaricana uses it in a very creative, unique way.

Amazon Rekognition allowed Arcanum to realize three distinct advantages:

  • Time savings – The time to market speed increased dramatically. Now, instead of spending several months of intense manual labor to label all the images, the company can do this job in a few days. Before, basic labeling on 150,000 images took months for three people to complete.
  • Cost savings – Arcanum saved around $15,000 on the Hungaricana project. Before using Amazon Rekognition, there was no automation, so a human workforce had to scan all the images. Now, employees can shift their focus to other high-value tasks.
  • Improved accuracy – Users now have a much better experience regarding hit rates. Since Arcanum started using Amazon Rekognition, the number of hits has doubled. Before, out of 500,000 images, about 200,000 weren’t searchable. But with Amazon Rekognition, search is now possible for all 500,000 images.

 “Amazon Rekognition made Hungarian culture, history, and heritage more accessible to the world,” says Előd Biszak, Arcanum CEO. “It has made research a lot easier for customers building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events. We cannot wait to see what the future of artificial intelligence has to offer to enrich our content further.”

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to add highly scalable face and image analysis to an enterprise-level image gallery to improve label accuracy, reduce costs, and save time.

You can test Amazon Rekognition features such as facial analysis, face comparison, or celebrity recognition on images specific to your use case on the Amazon Rekognition console.

For video presentations and tutorials, see Getting Started with Amazon Rekognition. For more information about Amazon Rekognition, see Amazon Rekognition Documentation.


About the Authors

Siniša Mikašinović is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS Luxembourg, covering Central and Eastern Europe—a region full of opportunities, talented and innovative developers, ISVs, and startups. He helps customers adopt AWS services as well as acquire new skills, learn best practices, and succeed globally with the power of AWS. His areas of expertise are Game Tech and Microsoft on AWS. Siniša is a PowerShell enthusiast, a gamer, and a father of a small and very loud boy. He flies under the flags of Croatia and Serbia.

Cameron Peron is Senior Marketing Manager for AWS Amazon Rekognition and the AWS AI/ML community. He evangelizes how AI/ML innovation solves complex challenges facing community, enterprise, and startups alike. Out of the office, he enjoys staying active with kettlebell-sport, spending time with his family and friends, and is an avid fan of Euro-league basketball.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/arcanum-makes-hungarian-heritage-accessible-with-amazon-rekognition/

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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