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Life after canceling Zendesk Relate

As events are being cancelled around the world, companies are learning to come up with alternatives. We spoke to Kate Kerner, VP of Global Events Marketing at Zendesk, about how they dealt with having to cancel their annual conference.

The post Life after canceling Zendesk Relate appeared first on Unbabel.

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Everything was ready to go. The food had been delivered to the venue, the custom-made signage was being strategically placed around the Miami Convention Center, and the yellow carpet was just waiting to be rolled out to welcome the event’s attendees. But then, something unexpected happened that stopped the world on its tracks.

We had all been witnessing the spread of the new Coronavirus from a distance, but none of us could foresee how fast it would make its way into our lives and force us to change it completely. Over the course of the last few weeks, businesses have been adjusting to a new reality as best as possible. For some, the transition from office life to remote life was smooth, while others — small local businesses or restaurants, for example — are struggling to stay afloat.

In the late days of February, our partners at Zendesk were busy putting the final touches to Zendesk Relate, the conference around which the whole company comes together once a year. After much consideration, they came to the conclusion that they couldn’t possibly put their staff, partners and customers at risk. On the 29th, a few days before the convention center was scheduled to open its doors, Zendesk Relate got canceled. But the show, fortunately, went on.

Kate Kerner, VP of Global Events Marketing at Zendesk, told us all about it.

Decisions, decisions

Making the decision to cancel an important event is never easy (take it from someone who had to cancel their 18th birthday party). For Zendesk, it was no different.

Kate Kerner says the team experienced a lot of mixed feelings. On the one hand, Zendesk Relate gives each individual contributor at the company the opportunity to shine by bringing their ideas and talents to the table. With the event canceled, there would be nothing to show for their hard work. On the other hand, they felt like they had to act as responsible global citizens and put their customers first. Keeping everyone involved safe was nonnegotiable. So despite canceling the event being an agonizing decision, it was the only right option.

As soon the decision was made, “very clear work streams were developed to tackle everything at hand”, Kerner recalls. When organizing such a big event, there are always contingency and safety plans in case something goes off track. But guidelines on how to deal with the event not happening all together weren’t among them, as being forced to cancel your annual conference within days of it kicking off is an unusual occurence. Zendesk started by “alerting attendees and employees, loading out the major event that was already being set up, working with vendors on cancellations, making sure speakers and sponsors were taken care of.”

We are no longer a startup but it’s critical that we maintain the ability to pivot with the agility of one.

So how did everyone react?

Kate Kerner doesn’t hide the fact that the cancellation was hard on people. As Sarah Reed, Zendesk’s Senior Director of Global Strategic Events, explained in her latest article, a lot of attendees had flown in to Miami earlier to “overcome jet lag or see family in Florida or take advantage of the beautiful weekend weather.” Getting that call or reading the e-mail saying the event they’d travelled from all over the world for was canceled was bound to make them feel anxious or angry.

But even those understood that it was the right call, and it didn’t take long for the messages of support for the Zendesk team to start pouring in.

Empathy and authenticity are core to everything we do. That remained true even in such a painful decision, and everyone involved for the most part seemed to get that.

For the attendees who were already in Miami, Zendesk was still able to provide a glimpse of what the Relate experience would be like, by hosting a breakfast for the entire community that was in the city. What was initially intended to be an intimate event turned out to present the unique chance for Relate attendees to connect and network, even if on a smaller scale.

Plan B

As for the new product announcements they were planning on making during the conference, Zendesk responded by doing so via video. They would rather have made the announcements in person, as Kerner explains, but she says customers’ responses to the video were positive. “Our customers expect us to rise to the occasion. I think they’re happy with how we communicated and what we communicated.”

In addition to the product announcements, Zendesk is working on an entire portfolio on online events and digital experiences that will be rolled out over the coming months. The digital version of Zendesk Relate is also taking place. Zendesk Relater, as it was called, is “the best Relate content squeezed into a virtual two hour hangout.”

For Kate Kerner, the creative challenge that comes from designing virtual events is being able to replicate the feel of a live event in an online environment. It isn’t an easy task, but she is confident that attendees will still learn from these experiences while connecting and having fun with each other.

It’s been a positive reception. Our customers look to us for ways to improve how they serve their customers, no matter what obstacles arise.

And what an obstacle this was. But in the face of it, Kerner believes the whole Zendesk team was able to learn a lot about itself, namely that what holds them together when everything goes well is also what helps them during a crisis.

Cancellation aftermath

After all attendees were notified, ticket sales refunded, and plans remade, there were still some technicalities to deal with. What was Zendesk going to do will all the food that was already stored at the venue, the event signage, and the 3,150 square feet of bright yellow carpet?

As can be read in Sarah Reed’s article, the food was distributed among multiple non-profits through a partnership between the Miami Convention Center and Food Rescue US. A part of the signage was donated “to Crayons to Computers, a non-profit in Ohio that supports teachers with classroom materials for their children”, while 60 pieces of it are going to be turned into an art installation by a local Miami artist. As for the carpet, it will cover the floor of the International Rescue Committee’s welcome center in Arizona, where it will hopefully brighten the days of those who seek shelter there.

The only thing Zendesk couldn’t find a new home for were the 800 popsicles they had ordered for the conference. But as Kate Kerner’s saying goes:

When life hands you 800 popsicles, eat a few and then share them with the community.

For now, there is no way of knowing when life will resume its usual course. Until then, let’s all stay home, wash our hands, and try to make the best of these weird times we’re living. Just like Zendesk is doing.

P.S.:

Zendesk Relater is taking place today, March 24th, at 9 am PDT/4 pm GMT. You can still register for it here.

AI

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage. Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, […]

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Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage.

Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, which enables you to search and explore Hungarian cultural heritage, including 600,000 faces over 500,000 images. For example, you can find historical works by author Mór Jókai or photos on topics like weddings. The Arcanum team chose Amazon Rekognition to free valuable staff from time and cost-intensive manual labeling, and improved label accuracy to make 200,000 previously unsearchable images (approximately 40% of image inventory), available to users.

Amazon Rekognition makes it easy to add image and video analysis to your applications using highly scalable machine learning (ML) technology that requires no previous ML expertise to use. Amazon Rekognition also provides highly accurate facial recognition and facial search capabilities to detect, analyze, and compare faces.

Arcanum uses this facial recognition feature in their image database services to help you find particular people in Arcanum’s articles. This post discusses their challenges and why they chose Amazon Rekognition as their solution.

Automated image labeling challenges

Arcanum dedicated a team of three people to start tagging and labeling content for Hungaricana. The team quickly learned that they would need to invest more than 3 months of time-consuming and repetitive human labor to provide accurate search capabilities to their customers. Considering the size of the team and scope of the existing project, Arcanum needed a better solution that would automate image and object labelling at scale.

Automated image labeling solutions

To speed up and automate image labeling, Arcanum turned to Amazon Rekognition to enable users to search photos by keywords (for example, type of historic event, place name, or a person relevant to Hungarian history).

For the Hungaricana project, preprocessing all the images was challenging. Arcanum ran a TensorFlow face search across all 28 million pages on a machine with 8 GPUs in their own offices to extract only faces from images.

The following screenshot shows what an extract looks like (image provided by Arcanum Database Ltd).

The images containing only faces are sent to Amazon Rekognition, invoking the IndexFaces operation to add a face to the collection. For each face that is detected in the specified face collection, Amazon Rekognition extracts facial features into a feature vector and stores it in an Amazon Aurora database. Amazon Rekognition uses feature vectors when it performs face match and search operations using the SearchFaces and SearchFacesByImage operations.

The image preprocessing helped create a very efficient and cost-effective way to index faces. The following diagram summarizes the preprocessing workflow.

As for the web application, the workflow starts with a Hungaricana user making a face search request. The following diagram illustrates the application workflow.

The workflow includes the following steps:

  1. The user requests a facial match by uploading the image. The web request is automatically distributed by the Elastic Load Balancer to the webserver fleet.
  2. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) powers application servers that handle the user request.
  3. The uploaded image is stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).
  4. Amazon Rekognition indexes the face and runs SearchFaces to look for a face similar to the new face ID.
  5. The output of the search face by image operation is stored in Amazon ElastiCache, a fully managed in-memory data store.
  6. The metadata of the indexed faces are stored in an Aurora relational database built for the cloud.
  7. The resulting face thumbnails are served to the customer via the fast content-delivery network (CDN) service Amazon CloudFront.

Experimenting and live testing Hungaricana

During our test of Hungaricana, the application performed extremely well. The searches not only correctly identified people, but also provided links to all publications and sources in Arcanum’s privately owned database where found faces are present. For example, the following screenshot shows the result of the famous composer and pianist Franz Liszt.

The application provided 42 pages of 6×4 results. The results are capped to 1,000. The 100% scores are the confidence scores returned by Amazon Rekognition and are rounded up to whole numbers.

The application of Hungaricana has always promptly, and with a high degree of certainty, presented results and links to all corresponding publications.

Business results

By introducing Amazon Rekognition into their workflow, Arcanum enabled a better customer experience, including building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events.

The concept of face searching using artificial intelligence certainly isn’t new. But Hungaricana uses it in a very creative, unique way.

Amazon Rekognition allowed Arcanum to realize three distinct advantages:

  • Time savings – The time to market speed increased dramatically. Now, instead of spending several months of intense manual labor to label all the images, the company can do this job in a few days. Before, basic labeling on 150,000 images took months for three people to complete.
  • Cost savings – Arcanum saved around $15,000 on the Hungaricana project. Before using Amazon Rekognition, there was no automation, so a human workforce had to scan all the images. Now, employees can shift their focus to other high-value tasks.
  • Improved accuracy – Users now have a much better experience regarding hit rates. Since Arcanum started using Amazon Rekognition, the number of hits has doubled. Before, out of 500,000 images, about 200,000 weren’t searchable. But with Amazon Rekognition, search is now possible for all 500,000 images.

 “Amazon Rekognition made Hungarian culture, history, and heritage more accessible to the world,” says Előd Biszak, Arcanum CEO. “It has made research a lot easier for customers building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events. We cannot wait to see what the future of artificial intelligence has to offer to enrich our content further.”

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to add highly scalable face and image analysis to an enterprise-level image gallery to improve label accuracy, reduce costs, and save time.

You can test Amazon Rekognition features such as facial analysis, face comparison, or celebrity recognition on images specific to your use case on the Amazon Rekognition console.

For video presentations and tutorials, see Getting Started with Amazon Rekognition. For more information about Amazon Rekognition, see Amazon Rekognition Documentation.


About the Authors

Siniša Mikašinović is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS Luxembourg, covering Central and Eastern Europe—a region full of opportunities, talented and innovative developers, ISVs, and startups. He helps customers adopt AWS services as well as acquire new skills, learn best practices, and succeed globally with the power of AWS. His areas of expertise are Game Tech and Microsoft on AWS. Siniša is a PowerShell enthusiast, a gamer, and a father of a small and very loud boy. He flies under the flags of Croatia and Serbia.

Cameron Peron is Senior Marketing Manager for AWS Amazon Rekognition and the AWS AI/ML community. He evangelizes how AI/ML innovation solves complex challenges facing community, enterprise, and startups alike. Out of the office, he enjoys staying active with kettlebell-sport, spending time with his family and friends, and is an avid fan of Euro-league basketball.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/arcanum-makes-hungarian-heritage-accessible-with-amazon-rekognition/

Continue Reading

AI

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage. Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, […]

Published

on

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage.

Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, which enables you to search and explore Hungarian cultural heritage, including 600,000 faces over 500,000 images. For example, you can find historical works by author Mór Jókai or photos on topics like weddings. The Arcanum team chose Amazon Rekognition to free valuable staff from time and cost-intensive manual labeling, and improved label accuracy to make 200,000 previously unsearchable images (approximately 40% of image inventory), available to users.

Amazon Rekognition makes it easy to add image and video analysis to your applications using highly scalable machine learning (ML) technology that requires no previous ML expertise to use. Amazon Rekognition also provides highly accurate facial recognition and facial search capabilities to detect, analyze, and compare faces.

Arcanum uses this facial recognition feature in their image database services to help you find particular people in Arcanum’s articles. This post discusses their challenges and why they chose Amazon Rekognition as their solution.

Automated image labeling challenges

Arcanum dedicated a team of three people to start tagging and labeling content for Hungaricana. The team quickly learned that they would need to invest more than 3 months of time-consuming and repetitive human labor to provide accurate search capabilities to their customers. Considering the size of the team and scope of the existing project, Arcanum needed a better solution that would automate image and object labelling at scale.

Automated image labeling solutions

To speed up and automate image labeling, Arcanum turned to Amazon Rekognition to enable users to search photos by keywords (for example, type of historic event, place name, or a person relevant to Hungarian history).

For the Hungaricana project, preprocessing all the images was challenging. Arcanum ran a TensorFlow face search across all 28 million pages on a machine with 8 GPUs in their own offices to extract only faces from images.

The following screenshot shows what an extract looks like (image provided by Arcanum Database Ltd).

The images containing only faces are sent to Amazon Rekognition, invoking the IndexFaces operation to add a face to the collection. For each face that is detected in the specified face collection, Amazon Rekognition extracts facial features into a feature vector and stores it in an Amazon Aurora database. Amazon Rekognition uses feature vectors when it performs face match and search operations using the SearchFaces and SearchFacesByImage operations.

The image preprocessing helped create a very efficient and cost-effective way to index faces. The following diagram summarizes the preprocessing workflow.

As for the web application, the workflow starts with a Hungaricana user making a face search request. The following diagram illustrates the application workflow.

The workflow includes the following steps:

  1. The user requests a facial match by uploading the image. The web request is automatically distributed by the Elastic Load Balancer to the webserver fleet.
  2. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) powers application servers that handle the user request.
  3. The uploaded image is stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).
  4. Amazon Rekognition indexes the face and runs SearchFaces to look for a face similar to the new face ID.
  5. The output of the search face by image operation is stored in Amazon ElastiCache, a fully managed in-memory data store.
  6. The metadata of the indexed faces are stored in an Aurora relational database built for the cloud.
  7. The resulting face thumbnails are served to the customer via the fast content-delivery network (CDN) service Amazon CloudFront.

Experimenting and live testing Hungaricana

During our test of Hungaricana, the application performed extremely well. The searches not only correctly identified people, but also provided links to all publications and sources in Arcanum’s privately owned database where found faces are present. For example, the following screenshot shows the result of the famous composer and pianist Franz Liszt.

The application provided 42 pages of 6×4 results. The results are capped to 1,000. The 100% scores are the confidence scores returned by Amazon Rekognition and are rounded up to whole numbers.

The application of Hungaricana has always promptly, and with a high degree of certainty, presented results and links to all corresponding publications.

Business results

By introducing Amazon Rekognition into their workflow, Arcanum enabled a better customer experience, including building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events.

The concept of face searching using artificial intelligence certainly isn’t new. But Hungaricana uses it in a very creative, unique way.

Amazon Rekognition allowed Arcanum to realize three distinct advantages:

  • Time savings – The time to market speed increased dramatically. Now, instead of spending several months of intense manual labor to label all the images, the company can do this job in a few days. Before, basic labeling on 150,000 images took months for three people to complete.
  • Cost savings – Arcanum saved around $15,000 on the Hungaricana project. Before using Amazon Rekognition, there was no automation, so a human workforce had to scan all the images. Now, employees can shift their focus to other high-value tasks.
  • Improved accuracy – Users now have a much better experience regarding hit rates. Since Arcanum started using Amazon Rekognition, the number of hits has doubled. Before, out of 500,000 images, about 200,000 weren’t searchable. But with Amazon Rekognition, search is now possible for all 500,000 images.

 “Amazon Rekognition made Hungarian culture, history, and heritage more accessible to the world,” says Előd Biszak, Arcanum CEO. “It has made research a lot easier for customers building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events. We cannot wait to see what the future of artificial intelligence has to offer to enrich our content further.”

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to add highly scalable face and image analysis to an enterprise-level image gallery to improve label accuracy, reduce costs, and save time.

You can test Amazon Rekognition features such as facial analysis, face comparison, or celebrity recognition on images specific to your use case on the Amazon Rekognition console.

For video presentations and tutorials, see Getting Started with Amazon Rekognition. For more information about Amazon Rekognition, see Amazon Rekognition Documentation.


About the Authors

Siniša Mikašinović is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS Luxembourg, covering Central and Eastern Europe—a region full of opportunities, talented and innovative developers, ISVs, and startups. He helps customers adopt AWS services as well as acquire new skills, learn best practices, and succeed globally with the power of AWS. His areas of expertise are Game Tech and Microsoft on AWS. Siniša is a PowerShell enthusiast, a gamer, and a father of a small and very loud boy. He flies under the flags of Croatia and Serbia.

Cameron Peron is Senior Marketing Manager for AWS Amazon Rekognition and the AWS AI/ML community. He evangelizes how AI/ML innovation solves complex challenges facing community, enterprise, and startups alike. Out of the office, he enjoys staying active with kettlebell-sport, spending time with his family and friends, and is an avid fan of Euro-league basketball.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/arcanum-makes-hungarian-heritage-accessible-with-amazon-rekognition/

Continue Reading

AI

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage. Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, […]

Published

on

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage.

Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, which enables you to search and explore Hungarian cultural heritage, including 600,000 faces over 500,000 images. For example, you can find historical works by author Mór Jókai or photos on topics like weddings. The Arcanum team chose Amazon Rekognition to free valuable staff from time and cost-intensive manual labeling, and improved label accuracy to make 200,000 previously unsearchable images (approximately 40% of image inventory), available to users.

Amazon Rekognition makes it easy to add image and video analysis to your applications using highly scalable machine learning (ML) technology that requires no previous ML expertise to use. Amazon Rekognition also provides highly accurate facial recognition and facial search capabilities to detect, analyze, and compare faces.

Arcanum uses this facial recognition feature in their image database services to help you find particular people in Arcanum’s articles. This post discusses their challenges and why they chose Amazon Rekognition as their solution.

Automated image labeling challenges

Arcanum dedicated a team of three people to start tagging and labeling content for Hungaricana. The team quickly learned that they would need to invest more than 3 months of time-consuming and repetitive human labor to provide accurate search capabilities to their customers. Considering the size of the team and scope of the existing project, Arcanum needed a better solution that would automate image and object labelling at scale.

Automated image labeling solutions

To speed up and automate image labeling, Arcanum turned to Amazon Rekognition to enable users to search photos by keywords (for example, type of historic event, place name, or a person relevant to Hungarian history).

For the Hungaricana project, preprocessing all the images was challenging. Arcanum ran a TensorFlow face search across all 28 million pages on a machine with 8 GPUs in their own offices to extract only faces from images.

The following screenshot shows what an extract looks like (image provided by Arcanum Database Ltd).

The images containing only faces are sent to Amazon Rekognition, invoking the IndexFaces operation to add a face to the collection. For each face that is detected in the specified face collection, Amazon Rekognition extracts facial features into a feature vector and stores it in an Amazon Aurora database. Amazon Rekognition uses feature vectors when it performs face match and search operations using the SearchFaces and SearchFacesByImage operations.

The image preprocessing helped create a very efficient and cost-effective way to index faces. The following diagram summarizes the preprocessing workflow.

As for the web application, the workflow starts with a Hungaricana user making a face search request. The following diagram illustrates the application workflow.

The workflow includes the following steps:

  1. The user requests a facial match by uploading the image. The web request is automatically distributed by the Elastic Load Balancer to the webserver fleet.
  2. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) powers application servers that handle the user request.
  3. The uploaded image is stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).
  4. Amazon Rekognition indexes the face and runs SearchFaces to look for a face similar to the new face ID.
  5. The output of the search face by image operation is stored in Amazon ElastiCache, a fully managed in-memory data store.
  6. The metadata of the indexed faces are stored in an Aurora relational database built for the cloud.
  7. The resulting face thumbnails are served to the customer via the fast content-delivery network (CDN) service Amazon CloudFront.

Experimenting and live testing Hungaricana

During our test of Hungaricana, the application performed extremely well. The searches not only correctly identified people, but also provided links to all publications and sources in Arcanum’s privately owned database where found faces are present. For example, the following screenshot shows the result of the famous composer and pianist Franz Liszt.

The application provided 42 pages of 6×4 results. The results are capped to 1,000. The 100% scores are the confidence scores returned by Amazon Rekognition and are rounded up to whole numbers.

The application of Hungaricana has always promptly, and with a high degree of certainty, presented results and links to all corresponding publications.

Business results

By introducing Amazon Rekognition into their workflow, Arcanum enabled a better customer experience, including building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events.

The concept of face searching using artificial intelligence certainly isn’t new. But Hungaricana uses it in a very creative, unique way.

Amazon Rekognition allowed Arcanum to realize three distinct advantages:

  • Time savings – The time to market speed increased dramatically. Now, instead of spending several months of intense manual labor to label all the images, the company can do this job in a few days. Before, basic labeling on 150,000 images took months for three people to complete.
  • Cost savings – Arcanum saved around $15,000 on the Hungaricana project. Before using Amazon Rekognition, there was no automation, so a human workforce had to scan all the images. Now, employees can shift their focus to other high-value tasks.
  • Improved accuracy – Users now have a much better experience regarding hit rates. Since Arcanum started using Amazon Rekognition, the number of hits has doubled. Before, out of 500,000 images, about 200,000 weren’t searchable. But with Amazon Rekognition, search is now possible for all 500,000 images.

 “Amazon Rekognition made Hungarian culture, history, and heritage more accessible to the world,” says Előd Biszak, Arcanum CEO. “It has made research a lot easier for customers building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events. We cannot wait to see what the future of artificial intelligence has to offer to enrich our content further.”

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to add highly scalable face and image analysis to an enterprise-level image gallery to improve label accuracy, reduce costs, and save time.

You can test Amazon Rekognition features such as facial analysis, face comparison, or celebrity recognition on images specific to your use case on the Amazon Rekognition console.

For video presentations and tutorials, see Getting Started with Amazon Rekognition. For more information about Amazon Rekognition, see Amazon Rekognition Documentation.


About the Authors

Siniša Mikašinović is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS Luxembourg, covering Central and Eastern Europe—a region full of opportunities, talented and innovative developers, ISVs, and startups. He helps customers adopt AWS services as well as acquire new skills, learn best practices, and succeed globally with the power of AWS. His areas of expertise are Game Tech and Microsoft on AWS. Siniša is a PowerShell enthusiast, a gamer, and a father of a small and very loud boy. He flies under the flags of Croatia and Serbia.

Cameron Peron is Senior Marketing Manager for AWS Amazon Rekognition and the AWS AI/ML community. He evangelizes how AI/ML innovation solves complex challenges facing community, enterprise, and startups alike. Out of the office, he enjoys staying active with kettlebell-sport, spending time with his family and friends, and is an avid fan of Euro-league basketball.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/arcanum-makes-hungarian-heritage-accessible-with-amazon-rekognition/

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

AI13 hours ago

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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