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Your customer support employees need you as much as your customers. Here’s how AI can help

As the grip of COVID-19 intensifies on an increasingly splintering world and more and more people shelter themselves indoors for work, life, and everything in between, businesses large and small are finding themselves struggling with an overbearing demand for answers. The customer is unravelling. People are looking for a semblance of clarity amid the confusion and uncertainty surrounding the pandemic. And service managers are finding it increasingly difficult to navigate the surging demand as support agents turn as panicked, anxious, and unsure as customers themselves.

Businesses spanning restaurants, food delivery, meal kits, healthcare, gaming, education, technology, streaming, e-commerce, and online subscription services are registering alarmingly high volumes of support tickets. Where the support reps are finding themselves overwhelmed by the burgeoning numbers, frustrated customers are experiencing hours-long wait times and turning more distraught.

A COVID one-two punch: support agents are growing as exasperated as the customers themselves

Even as these companies have latched on to a hiring spree to add up to the numbers, the customer service leaders are facing fresh challenges from training and monitoring new hires remotely to outfitting teams for remote work to ensuring smooth coordination and productivity.

And despite the hiring frenzy, teams cannot scale indefinitely and as immediately to keep up with business for want of a good ROI.

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In these strained circumstances, it can be difficult for your business to maintain trust and transparency, keep resolution times down, and ensure high CSAT. With limited resources, the task can as well feel Sisyphean.

AI-powered, collaborative solutions like chatbots, email bots, and voice bots are wellsprings of invaluable customer data and agility. From maintaining CSAT to boosting team productivity to crafting experiences that build long-term loyalty, AI tools can serve as the perfect aides to customer support agents and help your teams veer back to the path of the customer and employee happiness. Here’s how:

AI is available to hear out your customers’ requests, 24/7. It functions continuously without any need for breaks or sleep or sick leaves. In collaboration with your support teams, it can lead to a quick resolution of customer woes by immediately attending to all predictable and repetitive requests by itself and transferring the remaining more pressing and critical queries to support agents. For your agents working remotely, this can translate into a significant reduction in workload and stress. For your customers, the response times go down substantially. Win-win!

As customer request numbers rise precipitously, AI can scale indefinitely to immediately adapt to the evolving uptick. On the other hand, hiring new agents is a costly affair. It can take days, even weeks or sometimes, months, to hire a new employee and then some more for their on-boarding and training. In remote conditions, this process can only be more overwhelming.

AI can handle variegated requests, and thousands of them, at a single point in time. And it can be trained and deployed from anywhere — whether your teams are working from homes or the office. Once deployed, it constantly improves, one customer interaction at a time. It can be a fundamentally reassuring helping hand for your support agents in these precarious times when looming volumes of requests can make them feel stretched to their brink.

AI is always collecting vast amounts of user data which makes it capable of drawing insights and mapping customer trends. For instance, it will be able to alert customer service managers if there is a swell in tickets related to a specific issue, or within a specific geographic region. This can help the teams monitor the situation, immediately craft an appropriate response plan, and proactively respond to customers in the wake of it.

AI can monitor and measure employee wellbeing and productivity metrics in-depth. In real-time, it can familiarize customer service managers with what’s working and what’s not, and what agents need next. By helping your leaders keep track of SLAs, CSAT, resolution times, response times, and more, AI can help boost employee productivity and ensure employee happiness.

Research has consistently shown that the emotional labor that customer support reps are attuned to — the smiling through rudeness, the calming of nerves in the face of an angry customer, the constant control of one’s own emotions — can have “uniformly negative effects on workers”.

This study holds true in the normal world. Now, look at it through the lens of today’s crisis — the customers are uncertain, panicked, and anxious — and it all gets compounded significantly. The customer support reps too, individuals and families, confined at homes, are struggling with multiple jobs like parenting, teaching, household chores, keeping physically and mentally well, taking care of the elderly, etc. besides listening in on customer calls and replying to requests on chat and email.

AI can take care of the agents’ emotional wellbeing by taking significant workload and responsibility off their shoulders. It can also leverage sentiment analysis to direct frustrated or anxious customers to the right agents. For instance, this could be an agent who has not had a difficult customer in the last hour, sparing the agent who just got down with one on the call.

AI can scale across email, chat, and voice. It can strengthen the capabilities of your customer support network and ensure superior customer service notwithstanding if the customer phones in, sends in a chat request, or pings on Twitter. When you leverage AI, you don’t have to uphold or sacrifice performance on one channel while your teams focus on another. AI enables your business to be present on a customer’s channel of choice and ensure seamless experiences.

Source: https://chatbotslife.com/not-business-as-usual-da090dc871ec?source=rss—-a49517e4c30b—4

AI

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage. Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, […]

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Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage.

Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, which enables you to search and explore Hungarian cultural heritage, including 600,000 faces over 500,000 images. For example, you can find historical works by author Mór Jókai or photos on topics like weddings. The Arcanum team chose Amazon Rekognition to free valuable staff from time and cost-intensive manual labeling, and improved label accuracy to make 200,000 previously unsearchable images (approximately 40% of image inventory), available to users.

Amazon Rekognition makes it easy to add image and video analysis to your applications using highly scalable machine learning (ML) technology that requires no previous ML expertise to use. Amazon Rekognition also provides highly accurate facial recognition and facial search capabilities to detect, analyze, and compare faces.

Arcanum uses this facial recognition feature in their image database services to help you find particular people in Arcanum’s articles. This post discusses their challenges and why they chose Amazon Rekognition as their solution.

Automated image labeling challenges

Arcanum dedicated a team of three people to start tagging and labeling content for Hungaricana. The team quickly learned that they would need to invest more than 3 months of time-consuming and repetitive human labor to provide accurate search capabilities to their customers. Considering the size of the team and scope of the existing project, Arcanum needed a better solution that would automate image and object labelling at scale.

Automated image labeling solutions

To speed up and automate image labeling, Arcanum turned to Amazon Rekognition to enable users to search photos by keywords (for example, type of historic event, place name, or a person relevant to Hungarian history).

For the Hungaricana project, preprocessing all the images was challenging. Arcanum ran a TensorFlow face search across all 28 million pages on a machine with 8 GPUs in their own offices to extract only faces from images.

The following screenshot shows what an extract looks like (image provided by Arcanum Database Ltd).

The images containing only faces are sent to Amazon Rekognition, invoking the IndexFaces operation to add a face to the collection. For each face that is detected in the specified face collection, Amazon Rekognition extracts facial features into a feature vector and stores it in an Amazon Aurora database. Amazon Rekognition uses feature vectors when it performs face match and search operations using the SearchFaces and SearchFacesByImage operations.

The image preprocessing helped create a very efficient and cost-effective way to index faces. The following diagram summarizes the preprocessing workflow.

As for the web application, the workflow starts with a Hungaricana user making a face search request. The following diagram illustrates the application workflow.

The workflow includes the following steps:

  1. The user requests a facial match by uploading the image. The web request is automatically distributed by the Elastic Load Balancer to the webserver fleet.
  2. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) powers application servers that handle the user request.
  3. The uploaded image is stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).
  4. Amazon Rekognition indexes the face and runs SearchFaces to look for a face similar to the new face ID.
  5. The output of the search face by image operation is stored in Amazon ElastiCache, a fully managed in-memory data store.
  6. The metadata of the indexed faces are stored in an Aurora relational database built for the cloud.
  7. The resulting face thumbnails are served to the customer via the fast content-delivery network (CDN) service Amazon CloudFront.

Experimenting and live testing Hungaricana

During our test of Hungaricana, the application performed extremely well. The searches not only correctly identified people, but also provided links to all publications and sources in Arcanum’s privately owned database where found faces are present. For example, the following screenshot shows the result of the famous composer and pianist Franz Liszt.

The application provided 42 pages of 6×4 results. The results are capped to 1,000. The 100% scores are the confidence scores returned by Amazon Rekognition and are rounded up to whole numbers.

The application of Hungaricana has always promptly, and with a high degree of certainty, presented results and links to all corresponding publications.

Business results

By introducing Amazon Rekognition into their workflow, Arcanum enabled a better customer experience, including building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events.

The concept of face searching using artificial intelligence certainly isn’t new. But Hungaricana uses it in a very creative, unique way.

Amazon Rekognition allowed Arcanum to realize three distinct advantages:

  • Time savings – The time to market speed increased dramatically. Now, instead of spending several months of intense manual labor to label all the images, the company can do this job in a few days. Before, basic labeling on 150,000 images took months for three people to complete.
  • Cost savings – Arcanum saved around $15,000 on the Hungaricana project. Before using Amazon Rekognition, there was no automation, so a human workforce had to scan all the images. Now, employees can shift their focus to other high-value tasks.
  • Improved accuracy – Users now have a much better experience regarding hit rates. Since Arcanum started using Amazon Rekognition, the number of hits has doubled. Before, out of 500,000 images, about 200,000 weren’t searchable. But with Amazon Rekognition, search is now possible for all 500,000 images.

 “Amazon Rekognition made Hungarian culture, history, and heritage more accessible to the world,” says Előd Biszak, Arcanum CEO. “It has made research a lot easier for customers building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events. We cannot wait to see what the future of artificial intelligence has to offer to enrich our content further.”

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to add highly scalable face and image analysis to an enterprise-level image gallery to improve label accuracy, reduce costs, and save time.

You can test Amazon Rekognition features such as facial analysis, face comparison, or celebrity recognition on images specific to your use case on the Amazon Rekognition console.

For video presentations and tutorials, see Getting Started with Amazon Rekognition. For more information about Amazon Rekognition, see Amazon Rekognition Documentation.


About the Authors

Siniša Mikašinović is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS Luxembourg, covering Central and Eastern Europe—a region full of opportunities, talented and innovative developers, ISVs, and startups. He helps customers adopt AWS services as well as acquire new skills, learn best practices, and succeed globally with the power of AWS. His areas of expertise are Game Tech and Microsoft on AWS. Siniša is a PowerShell enthusiast, a gamer, and a father of a small and very loud boy. He flies under the flags of Croatia and Serbia.

Cameron Peron is Senior Marketing Manager for AWS Amazon Rekognition and the AWS AI/ML community. He evangelizes how AI/ML innovation solves complex challenges facing community, enterprise, and startups alike. Out of the office, he enjoys staying active with kettlebell-sport, spending time with his family and friends, and is an avid fan of Euro-league basketball.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/arcanum-makes-hungarian-heritage-accessible-with-amazon-rekognition/

Continue Reading

AI

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage. Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, […]

Published

on

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage.

Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, which enables you to search and explore Hungarian cultural heritage, including 600,000 faces over 500,000 images. For example, you can find historical works by author Mór Jókai or photos on topics like weddings. The Arcanum team chose Amazon Rekognition to free valuable staff from time and cost-intensive manual labeling, and improved label accuracy to make 200,000 previously unsearchable images (approximately 40% of image inventory), available to users.

Amazon Rekognition makes it easy to add image and video analysis to your applications using highly scalable machine learning (ML) technology that requires no previous ML expertise to use. Amazon Rekognition also provides highly accurate facial recognition and facial search capabilities to detect, analyze, and compare faces.

Arcanum uses this facial recognition feature in their image database services to help you find particular people in Arcanum’s articles. This post discusses their challenges and why they chose Amazon Rekognition as their solution.

Automated image labeling challenges

Arcanum dedicated a team of three people to start tagging and labeling content for Hungaricana. The team quickly learned that they would need to invest more than 3 months of time-consuming and repetitive human labor to provide accurate search capabilities to their customers. Considering the size of the team and scope of the existing project, Arcanum needed a better solution that would automate image and object labelling at scale.

Automated image labeling solutions

To speed up and automate image labeling, Arcanum turned to Amazon Rekognition to enable users to search photos by keywords (for example, type of historic event, place name, or a person relevant to Hungarian history).

For the Hungaricana project, preprocessing all the images was challenging. Arcanum ran a TensorFlow face search across all 28 million pages on a machine with 8 GPUs in their own offices to extract only faces from images.

The following screenshot shows what an extract looks like (image provided by Arcanum Database Ltd).

The images containing only faces are sent to Amazon Rekognition, invoking the IndexFaces operation to add a face to the collection. For each face that is detected in the specified face collection, Amazon Rekognition extracts facial features into a feature vector and stores it in an Amazon Aurora database. Amazon Rekognition uses feature vectors when it performs face match and search operations using the SearchFaces and SearchFacesByImage operations.

The image preprocessing helped create a very efficient and cost-effective way to index faces. The following diagram summarizes the preprocessing workflow.

As for the web application, the workflow starts with a Hungaricana user making a face search request. The following diagram illustrates the application workflow.

The workflow includes the following steps:

  1. The user requests a facial match by uploading the image. The web request is automatically distributed by the Elastic Load Balancer to the webserver fleet.
  2. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) powers application servers that handle the user request.
  3. The uploaded image is stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).
  4. Amazon Rekognition indexes the face and runs SearchFaces to look for a face similar to the new face ID.
  5. The output of the search face by image operation is stored in Amazon ElastiCache, a fully managed in-memory data store.
  6. The metadata of the indexed faces are stored in an Aurora relational database built for the cloud.
  7. The resulting face thumbnails are served to the customer via the fast content-delivery network (CDN) service Amazon CloudFront.

Experimenting and live testing Hungaricana

During our test of Hungaricana, the application performed extremely well. The searches not only correctly identified people, but also provided links to all publications and sources in Arcanum’s privately owned database where found faces are present. For example, the following screenshot shows the result of the famous composer and pianist Franz Liszt.

The application provided 42 pages of 6×4 results. The results are capped to 1,000. The 100% scores are the confidence scores returned by Amazon Rekognition and are rounded up to whole numbers.

The application of Hungaricana has always promptly, and with a high degree of certainty, presented results and links to all corresponding publications.

Business results

By introducing Amazon Rekognition into their workflow, Arcanum enabled a better customer experience, including building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events.

The concept of face searching using artificial intelligence certainly isn’t new. But Hungaricana uses it in a very creative, unique way.

Amazon Rekognition allowed Arcanum to realize three distinct advantages:

  • Time savings – The time to market speed increased dramatically. Now, instead of spending several months of intense manual labor to label all the images, the company can do this job in a few days. Before, basic labeling on 150,000 images took months for three people to complete.
  • Cost savings – Arcanum saved around $15,000 on the Hungaricana project. Before using Amazon Rekognition, there was no automation, so a human workforce had to scan all the images. Now, employees can shift their focus to other high-value tasks.
  • Improved accuracy – Users now have a much better experience regarding hit rates. Since Arcanum started using Amazon Rekognition, the number of hits has doubled. Before, out of 500,000 images, about 200,000 weren’t searchable. But with Amazon Rekognition, search is now possible for all 500,000 images.

 “Amazon Rekognition made Hungarian culture, history, and heritage more accessible to the world,” says Előd Biszak, Arcanum CEO. “It has made research a lot easier for customers building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events. We cannot wait to see what the future of artificial intelligence has to offer to enrich our content further.”

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to add highly scalable face and image analysis to an enterprise-level image gallery to improve label accuracy, reduce costs, and save time.

You can test Amazon Rekognition features such as facial analysis, face comparison, or celebrity recognition on images specific to your use case on the Amazon Rekognition console.

For video presentations and tutorials, see Getting Started with Amazon Rekognition. For more information about Amazon Rekognition, see Amazon Rekognition Documentation.


About the Authors

Siniša Mikašinović is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS Luxembourg, covering Central and Eastern Europe—a region full of opportunities, talented and innovative developers, ISVs, and startups. He helps customers adopt AWS services as well as acquire new skills, learn best practices, and succeed globally with the power of AWS. His areas of expertise are Game Tech and Microsoft on AWS. Siniša is a PowerShell enthusiast, a gamer, and a father of a small and very loud boy. He flies under the flags of Croatia and Serbia.

Cameron Peron is Senior Marketing Manager for AWS Amazon Rekognition and the AWS AI/ML community. He evangelizes how AI/ML innovation solves complex challenges facing community, enterprise, and startups alike. Out of the office, he enjoys staying active with kettlebell-sport, spending time with his family and friends, and is an avid fan of Euro-league basketball.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/arcanum-makes-hungarian-heritage-accessible-with-amazon-rekognition/

Continue Reading

AI

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage. Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, […]

Published

on

Arcanum specializes in digitizing Hungarian language content, including newspapers, books, maps, and art. With over 30 years of experience, Arcanum serves more than 30,000 global subscribers with access to Hungarian culture, history, and heritage.

Amazon Rekognition Solutions Architects worked with Arcanum to add highly scalable image analysis to Hungaricana, a free service provided by Arcanum, which enables you to search and explore Hungarian cultural heritage, including 600,000 faces over 500,000 images. For example, you can find historical works by author Mór Jókai or photos on topics like weddings. The Arcanum team chose Amazon Rekognition to free valuable staff from time and cost-intensive manual labeling, and improved label accuracy to make 200,000 previously unsearchable images (approximately 40% of image inventory), available to users.

Amazon Rekognition makes it easy to add image and video analysis to your applications using highly scalable machine learning (ML) technology that requires no previous ML expertise to use. Amazon Rekognition also provides highly accurate facial recognition and facial search capabilities to detect, analyze, and compare faces.

Arcanum uses this facial recognition feature in their image database services to help you find particular people in Arcanum’s articles. This post discusses their challenges and why they chose Amazon Rekognition as their solution.

Automated image labeling challenges

Arcanum dedicated a team of three people to start tagging and labeling content for Hungaricana. The team quickly learned that they would need to invest more than 3 months of time-consuming and repetitive human labor to provide accurate search capabilities to their customers. Considering the size of the team and scope of the existing project, Arcanum needed a better solution that would automate image and object labelling at scale.

Automated image labeling solutions

To speed up and automate image labeling, Arcanum turned to Amazon Rekognition to enable users to search photos by keywords (for example, type of historic event, place name, or a person relevant to Hungarian history).

For the Hungaricana project, preprocessing all the images was challenging. Arcanum ran a TensorFlow face search across all 28 million pages on a machine with 8 GPUs in their own offices to extract only faces from images.

The following screenshot shows what an extract looks like (image provided by Arcanum Database Ltd).

The images containing only faces are sent to Amazon Rekognition, invoking the IndexFaces operation to add a face to the collection. For each face that is detected in the specified face collection, Amazon Rekognition extracts facial features into a feature vector and stores it in an Amazon Aurora database. Amazon Rekognition uses feature vectors when it performs face match and search operations using the SearchFaces and SearchFacesByImage operations.

The image preprocessing helped create a very efficient and cost-effective way to index faces. The following diagram summarizes the preprocessing workflow.

As for the web application, the workflow starts with a Hungaricana user making a face search request. The following diagram illustrates the application workflow.

The workflow includes the following steps:

  1. The user requests a facial match by uploading the image. The web request is automatically distributed by the Elastic Load Balancer to the webserver fleet.
  2. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) powers application servers that handle the user request.
  3. The uploaded image is stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).
  4. Amazon Rekognition indexes the face and runs SearchFaces to look for a face similar to the new face ID.
  5. The output of the search face by image operation is stored in Amazon ElastiCache, a fully managed in-memory data store.
  6. The metadata of the indexed faces are stored in an Aurora relational database built for the cloud.
  7. The resulting face thumbnails are served to the customer via the fast content-delivery network (CDN) service Amazon CloudFront.

Experimenting and live testing Hungaricana

During our test of Hungaricana, the application performed extremely well. The searches not only correctly identified people, but also provided links to all publications and sources in Arcanum’s privately owned database where found faces are present. For example, the following screenshot shows the result of the famous composer and pianist Franz Liszt.

The application provided 42 pages of 6×4 results. The results are capped to 1,000. The 100% scores are the confidence scores returned by Amazon Rekognition and are rounded up to whole numbers.

The application of Hungaricana has always promptly, and with a high degree of certainty, presented results and links to all corresponding publications.

Business results

By introducing Amazon Rekognition into their workflow, Arcanum enabled a better customer experience, including building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events.

The concept of face searching using artificial intelligence certainly isn’t new. But Hungaricana uses it in a very creative, unique way.

Amazon Rekognition allowed Arcanum to realize three distinct advantages:

  • Time savings – The time to market speed increased dramatically. Now, instead of spending several months of intense manual labor to label all the images, the company can do this job in a few days. Before, basic labeling on 150,000 images took months for three people to complete.
  • Cost savings – Arcanum saved around $15,000 on the Hungaricana project. Before using Amazon Rekognition, there was no automation, so a human workforce had to scan all the images. Now, employees can shift their focus to other high-value tasks.
  • Improved accuracy – Users now have a much better experience regarding hit rates. Since Arcanum started using Amazon Rekognition, the number of hits has doubled. Before, out of 500,000 images, about 200,000 weren’t searchable. But with Amazon Rekognition, search is now possible for all 500,000 images.

 “Amazon Rekognition made Hungarian culture, history, and heritage more accessible to the world,” says Előd Biszak, Arcanum CEO. “It has made research a lot easier for customers building family trees, searching for historical figures, and researching historical places and events. We cannot wait to see what the future of artificial intelligence has to offer to enrich our content further.”

Conclusion

In this post, you learned how to add highly scalable face and image analysis to an enterprise-level image gallery to improve label accuracy, reduce costs, and save time.

You can test Amazon Rekognition features such as facial analysis, face comparison, or celebrity recognition on images specific to your use case on the Amazon Rekognition console.

For video presentations and tutorials, see Getting Started with Amazon Rekognition. For more information about Amazon Rekognition, see Amazon Rekognition Documentation.


About the Authors

Siniša Mikašinović is a Senior Solutions Architect at AWS Luxembourg, covering Central and Eastern Europe—a region full of opportunities, talented and innovative developers, ISVs, and startups. He helps customers adopt AWS services as well as acquire new skills, learn best practices, and succeed globally with the power of AWS. His areas of expertise are Game Tech and Microsoft on AWS. Siniša is a PowerShell enthusiast, a gamer, and a father of a small and very loud boy. He flies under the flags of Croatia and Serbia.

Cameron Peron is Senior Marketing Manager for AWS Amazon Rekognition and the AWS AI/ML community. He evangelizes how AI/ML innovation solves complex challenges facing community, enterprise, and startups alike. Out of the office, he enjoys staying active with kettlebell-sport, spending time with his family and friends, and is an avid fan of Euro-league basketball.

Source: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/machine-learning/arcanum-makes-hungarian-heritage-accessible-with-amazon-rekognition/

Continue Reading
AI6 hours ago

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

AI6 hours ago

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

AI6 hours ago

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

AI6 hours ago

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

AI6 hours ago

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

AI6 hours ago

Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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Arcanum makes Hungarian heritage accessible with Amazon Rekognition

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